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  Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Clematis Koreana
    Posted: 19 Feb 2007 at 5:09pm

Has anyone got a magical way to grow Koreana's, I have tried in the soil - I think my soil is too damp, last year I bought some chiney pots and filled them with very sandy, gritty soil but so far they are not looking too healthy.

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  Quote Helen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Feb 2007 at 7:23pm
I have tried growing Koreana from seed, no problems germinating but they rot very easily.  Plant in almost pure gravel, plant under eaves of house,do not plant too deep, keep crown /roots just under gravel. I do not have these planted in my clay soil, to wet and cold in winter.  I have Blue Eclipse, Broughton Bride in pots under shelter. I planted Propertius near our front door, under eaves and this is budding up beautifully, so seems to be happy. Raised gravel beds would be another idea.  I wonder if anyone else has any other good ideas. Good luck Gill.
Helen (Sussex UK)
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  Quote ton hannink Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Feb 2007 at 7:55pm
My different koreana seedlings are in pots and then I have good results. In the garden it is too wet in winter.
You need a dry place in winter.
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  Quote schristmas Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Feb 2007 at 10:23pm
Hi Gill,
 
Not an easy subject but I will give you my point of view (for what its worth).
 
Koreanas seem to be difficult customers but I think there are a number of factors that it seems to like or dislike depending on the way you look at it.
 
Firstly the cultivars such as 'Columella', 'Propertius' & 'Broughton Bride' to name but a few will grow in moderately wet conditions and do like to be fed although I would always advise good drainage. They are crosses of C.koreana and another member of the atragene family and this is what I believe makes them slightly more adaptable to the UK climate. Two years ago I decided not to feed 'Columella' and it became stunted and threw out a few short stumps of growth with few flowers. A good feed of fish, blood & bone had it going like a rocket and producing flower after flower with plenty of growth.
 
Pure C.koreana and its selections are different and more difficult to grow.  I have grown many forms including seedlings with results varying from poor (i.e. they died) to incredible. It is true that feeding seemed to make little difference to their performance and those in warmer soil conditions faired little better than those in colder sites. An example that stood head and shoulders above any other was 'Dark Secret' which grew to 12ft tall by 6ft wide - I had to prune it to keep it in check! It was planted about 6 inches from the main trunk of a leylandii tree which sucked just about everything out of the soil that came within a radius of about 3ft. It was amazing to see this plant throw out shoots from the ground as thick as your fingers, as if it was in competition with the tree. It was planted on the north easterly side of the trunk but used to get dappled light through the side of the tree and from overhead during summer. I used to give it a very small amount of feed in April and then left it to its own devices.
 
Magnus Johnsons magnificent book quotes in its habitat other plants found growing in its locality including many shrubs which are lime tolerant but a few that definitely prefer more acidic soil and one shrub that is always mentioned is the rhododendron. This may actually point to a factor that it prefers slightly acidic soil and this further leads me on to an article in the last BCS newsletter by Roy Nunn. Roy experimented with applying a feed for acid loving plants to clematis with yellow leaf syndrome when they showed little reaction to the normal application of Epsom Salts - the results were amazing. No guessing which plant he experimented with, but I will leave it to you to read his article if you missed it the first time.
 
Hope there is something of use in amongst all this.
 
Steve
 
 
 


Edited by schristmas - 20 Feb 2007 at 10:26pm
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  Quote basilski Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Feb 2007 at 10:06pm
Smileihave a koreana planted in a dry sth west facing border against a wall quite strong 2yrs old last season i olnly had 3 or 4 flowers this summer being the 3rd year
i am hoping for more, they certainly dont want it damp. a dry flwer pot sounds a good idea .
BASILSKI
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  Quote Ron.G.Carlile Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 May 2007 at 9:48pm
Ron.G.Carlile
Hi there
I have found the comments on C.koreana interesting as
 I have a dozen or so of plants in various stages of growth .
They were grown from seed in 2005 ,from seeds given
me by Mike Brown , I assume they are of the verity, as no name was given . One had reached flowering size until a squirrel thought the tip would taste good. I am hoping that there may be buds on the side shoots.  The rest due mostly to my neglect are going to be at least another year be for I get any results. The soil is a mixture of man made compost ,soil, some limestone chippings and vermiculites, I just guess the mix until it feels right .  I use this mix for all my clematis with varying amounts of John Innings according to the size of the plant .  I grew over fifty C.Paten's this way most of which I gave to the BCS to sell .
I am new to the forum but have been a member of the BCS for years , I find this way of communicating most interesting . I look forward to gathering more information from it . Best Wishes  Ron.G.Carlile


Edited by Ron.G.Carlile - 18 Jun 2007 at 10:11pm
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  Quote finn Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 23 May 2007 at 11:13pm
We also grow clematis koreana here in Oslo. It is a seedling of koreana fragrans from a friend in western Norway - (but it is not fragrant). It is placed underneath a big tree, and is about 2 meters high. It is in normal clayrich soil here, and seem to be very happy as long as it becomes regular watering. Like all clematis - good feeding and watering - is very important.
The flowers look nice and here is a picture of one of the flowers last summer. It is already having many buds, but they are not yet fully open.
finn
with favourite clematis "Dawn"
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  Quote Guests Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 May 2007 at 7:32pm

I have been growing koreanas for over 10 years and have not found them difficult. They grow well in our well drained soil over chalk subsoil. I grow all Atragenes that are potted up in alpine type compost, also I have found that koreanas do not survive over winter if kept in a cold greenhouse. Plants overwinter if left outside. If you have poorly drained soil make a small raised bed and fill this with a compost suitable for alpines. Occasionally the  leaves go chloritic due to the very alkaline soil in our garden, this can be cured by feeding with Epsom Salts, followed by a dose of ericasious plant food

Roy Cambridge

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  Quote Ron.G.Carlile Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Jun 2007 at 8:45pm

Further to my mail of  23 May 07.   I complained that a squirrel had made a a meal of the tip of a C.Koreana plant .  Well it seems to have done me a favor , I took the plant back into the greenhouse and placed it on a bed of gravel . Two new growths sprouted  from just under the break. They are now 30 inch long and both are bearing buds . also there are new shoots from other leaf joints on the main stem . The main stem is around five feet in height , and the new growths are tied into wires along the inside roof Of the greenhouse.      I have a further dozen plants , and to look at them you would wonder if they were the same species by there difference in development . Two or three look as if they will flower in the next months ,(so I hope )   I have never grown this verity before so I am looking forward to see what the flowers will be like . I have found that the plants do not like being in wet and cold soil , so i intend for now to grow the plants in pots standing on wet gravel and see if this is what they prefer , will keep in touch .

Best Wishes Ron.C

Edited by Ron.G.Carlile - 23 Jun 2007 at 11:21am
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  Quote richardh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Jun 2007 at 4:25pm
Ron,you sound to be a very interesting and knowledgable bloke with plenty of hands-on experience .Please do us all a favour and keep sending us your tips on clematis growing .A few pictures of some of your raisings would be good also.
Thanks for making this forum more interesting.
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  Quote Ron.G.Carlile Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Jun 2007 at 10:35pm
Hi Richard ,
Thank you for your complements  . Whilst I listed photography as one of my interests ,  I have not been in the habit of taking them of my plants , you may think it a bit strange to have not done this , but I  have always had a ruling that I worked for money , and my hobbies I did for fun  .  Strange as it may be to you I have kept to that rule and then I do not have any commitment too any one .   At my age I may go a few  or more days when I do not even look at the plants , it all depends on the weather or my back .   Just now every thing in the garden is almost drowned , but as soon as the weather dries up I will try to oblige .
Best Wishes     
Ron.C
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  Quote Ron.G.Carlile Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2007 at 10:32pm
Hi Finn and Richard .
Further to my posting on C.koreana .,  Three of my plants showed new growth and two of them have flowered . The first was like the one shown by Finn but the sepals were a  bit more powder blue . That was the plant the squirrel stopped for me . It is a bit of an untidy plant the new growths are 15 to 18 inch long before they flower.
The second plant to flower is smaller , the outer sepals are 5.5 cm from tip to tip
the sepals are curved out the in then out again , a delicate light cream with speckles , the inner petals are fully double you can not see the stamen , again a delicate cream   . The plant has sent up four shoots from the crown non more than
80Cm with flower buds on the tip of each growth  a side shoot has the Forth bud
The third plant I stopped the same as the first , it has made side shoots which have buds on them still to open , six or seven .  In future I will definitely Stop my C.koreana , if they grow to high without flower buds .   Richard asked me to put photo's of them on the page but up to now I have not got a clue , I was brought building steam loco's not on computers .  I promise to still keep trying
Best Wishes   Ron.C.


Edited by Ron.G.Carlile - 15 Jul 2007 at 10:36pm
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  Quote richardh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Jul 2007 at 11:08am

If you can't manage koreana photos I'll settle for photos of the steam locos,please.

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  Quote Jackog Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Jul 2007 at 7:21pm
Ron,
I had problems posting pictures but Brian's info soon helped me out!
Have a look at "Topic: Adding pictures to your post" Its in the second page of "old" topics.
Regards,
                 Jack
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  Quote Ron.G.Carlile Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 19 Jul 2007 at 9:44pm
Hi Richard and Jack .
First Richard I am sorry to say you are a lot of years to late as all the photo's I had went to a rail enthusiast before I retired all I  have left is a picture of my Wife's Dad driving his loco back to Copley Hill Depot near Leeds , and one of him in close up
with a Pacific Class loco  'Sir Nigel Grisley ' 60007.  The thing I have held on to is a copy of a 1927 The Steam Locomotive . Its failures and how to deal with them .The illustrations are hand drawn , the ones of the fire  box you can almost feel the heat.  I will leave it now it is clematis site.
Jack thank you so for bringing the article to my attention , the problem is that by the time I have returned to my article I  have forgot what to do .OLD AGE. I will have to ask Steve if the postings are printable . Thanks again
Best Wishes to you both
Ron.C
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  Quote Jackog Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 Jul 2007 at 8:35pm
Ron,
If you "select" (highlight) the message text that is of interest and then do "Control+C", the text is copies into the buffer of your computer. If you then open a document and do "Control+V" the text will be pasted into the document. It can then be printed like any other document.
I had the same problem as yourself and had to print the instruction myself.
Regards, Jack


Edited by Jackog - 20 Jul 2007 at 8:36pm
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  Quote Ron.G.Carlile Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Jul 2007 at 11:45am
Hello Jack
I would thank you for your advice which worked perfectly .  I have tried twice since to put photo's on the form, but for some reason or other I cannot get the reply button to work on the post pictures ,and then when I do , the post reply button did not respond .  I don't know if it is my computer link but some thing is wrong . Richard asked me to put on some of my seed grown flowers but until I can get it to work , there is no chance .  I will try again when I have more time .
Thank again
Best Wishes  Ron.C
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  Quote Jackog Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Jul 2007 at 8:37pm
Ron,
If you want to post pictures you must use the "reply" button on the R/H side of the screen and do not use the "Quick reply" form at the bottom of the screen. That reply mode is only suitable for text.
When I first tried to send images I had the same problem!
 
Also, don't forget to reduce the size of the images though.
 
Regards,
Jack
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  Quote Ron.G.Carlile Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Aug 2007 at 10:24pm
Hi Jack
Thanks for your advice , sorry to take so long to reply .  I did use the box at  the top of the page , but after a couple of hours one afternoon trying to get a photo on the page , and then another afternoon I at last managed to get a couple of photo's on and a few words , I tied to transfer it on to the preview , and all I got was a blank page . I either do not have the correct link or some thing is wrong with the link, I believe others have had the same problem . will try again when I have the time ,
or I may ask advice from Steve Christmas again .
All the best for now , enjoy the weather while it lasts
Ron.C.
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  Quote Jackog Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Aug 2007 at 10:42pm
Hi Ron,
All I can suggest is Try Again with a simple test piece, or chat with Steve Christmas!
 
Regards,
                  Jack
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  Quote Ron.G.Carlile Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Oct 2007 at 4:56pm
The above are two of the resulting flowers from C.koriana that I sowed dec 2005
The seeds were given to me by Mike Brown . had about a dozen plants grew which
I me admit were sadly neglected , so this spring i took them into  the greenhouse
with the results above , and further down . As it was a bit late in the season ,I nipped
out the growth point and this started the flower shoots forming .  The first Blue of the above , was not a strong plant and only had a few flowers , the Yellow one was
the best of the lot , flowers 8 to 10 CM across with two flushes of flowers of 30
plus each time . The Pink flower (I got the pixels wrong ) is the same size as are
all but the yellow flower with the twisted sepals .  All the plants grew up to 10 foot
in the greenhouse , except this plant which did not grow more than a metre
CM. and had a good number of flowers I will be keeping this plant in the greenhouse next year to see if it maintains this form . If it does I will take cuttings from it and see if they perform the same . There are still seven plants that did not flower this year . so I will replant them and see what next year brings, any not up to scratch are for the compost heap.  But it keeps the interest going .
 
 
 
Sorry if the layout is a bit untidy but it shows the results you can get from a
packet of seeds
 


Edited by Ron.G.Carlile - 15 Oct 2007 at 4:59pm
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  Quote richardh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Oct 2007 at 5:53pm
Fascinating story Ron and such lovely plants.   What a colourful mixture.    I really like the twisted one.  Thanks for showing us.
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  Quote joclemy Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 10 Nov 2007 at 7:11pm
Hi Ron,
 
I enjoyed your photos of C.Koreana.
 
I love this group.
 
Some seedlings from BSC seed have flowered this year one is very much like your yellow seedling.  Most of my C. Koreana are in poor soil and pretty dry places. This may be why I do not have much trouble with them.
 
josie
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  Quote Ron.G.Carlile Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 14 Nov 2007 at 10:16pm
Hi Josie
The pictures I posted were from flowers grown in a cold greenhouse ,that is why there are bits of wire and spring showing . I will be planting the best of the plants out in spring ( They may be hardy but I am not ) If I can find room they will be in a raised bed facing west .   So there is a chance as to whether They are tolerant of these conditions .  The problem with growing from seed is the length of time be for you know the quality of the product , patience is not one of my strong points ,it will prove if they are worth keeping or not . The best of luck with your plant.
Best Wishes     Ron.C
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  Quote Aidan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Apr 2008 at 10:48pm
Hi everyone
 
I have just recently joined BCS and this is my first post. I was particularly interested in the debates about C.Koreana. I have C.Koreana var lutea which I bought from Crug Farm Plants last October. It has been in my unheated greenhouse over winter and it has been outside in its pot for the last 4 weeks. When I bought it, it was a very old single woody stem with some huge dormant buds. In the last 6 weeks these have opened to produce some very thick leaflets from which I have taken 2 cuttings.   
 
My garden is very heavy clay so I was a bit disappointed to read that this is probably the worst soil condition for it. However I do have a sunny area on a south facing fence which is higher and quite dry, so I will plant it here with plenty of grit mixed in. I think Steve has a point when he says that Magnus Johnson mentions the habitat where the Koreana collection was found which was shrubby forest that included many plants that prefer acidic soil such as acers and rhododendrons, so I will probably add some ericasious compost to the mix. Among my many clematis I have a cirrhosa L. var purpurascens freckles which has survived for 3 years and has flowered every year, so I have high hopes for the Koreana. I will let you know how it fares.
 
Aidan 
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  Quote Ron.G.Carlile Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Apr 2008 at 5:34pm
Hello Aidan
I had a look around the garden at the C.koriana plants which I grew from seed in 2005 and posted photos of 15 Oct 2007 .  The best of the plants I planted outside early spring
The ones that are doing the best are planted in a south east corner of the garden in an area that does not get a lot of rain , the others look OK but are not putting on as much growth . All where cut back to about 15 to 20 cm
so it will take time for them too fill out .  One of the plants whict I did not find room for at that time is still in the pot ( 20cm plastic ) is the Blue one shown
in the Previouse posting , was also cut back to 20cm and as now is carrying seven flowers it has been stood out side since Feb 08.   My garden soil is fast draning There has been stacks of manure and compost dug in but it still dries out too quick . But I still try to grow any type of clematis I get my hands on ,some make it  usualy not the ones I prefer ,but thats life . The best of luck with your plants
Ron.C 
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  Quote Ron.G.Carlile Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Sep 2008 at 5:14pm
Hi Gill
The last three of the C.koriana seeds have flowered this summer , all three have turned out to be Pink , whilst the flowers are attractive there has been a lot of variation in growth a density of flowers . The best way I have found is to pinch out the stems at about  Meter high and the flowering shoots from this seem to bear more flowers , it may delays flowering for a few weeks but you get a lot more flowers.  The only things I have learned from growing C.koriana is that they do not like a too acid soil ,they do not like constant wet soil , in winter it is well to mulch the roots , but not with material that holds a lot of water . They prefer sun but will tolerate tree shade . a high potash feed increase flowering and colour , they do not cling very well by themselves .
I have had three colours Blue ,Pink and Yellow , I think I prefer the yellow as in my case they have flowered more and look brighter . But thats my taste. My favored is the dwarf yellow , which I must admit is still in a pot . I will still  grow the variety but only keep a few , My friends always seem to find room for my surplus plants .  Now I hope on to  the next variety I can find .
Best wishes
Ron.C
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  Quote Everett Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Jan 2009 at 4:59pm
In my experience the key to successful koreana culture is definitely the soil. We have grown some monsters at the bcs trials ground because the soil is light, sandy and free draining. Like most species, the roots are thin and fiberous, which easily rot away if the conditions are too damp. Try Broughton Bride, it's gorgeous. E
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