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Late Flowering Clematis

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redwing View Drop Down
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  Quote redwing Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Late Flowering Clematis
    Posted: 15 Jun 2010 at 1:13pm
Hello,
I am looking for advice on a late flowering clematis. One which can be pruned to just above ground level to allow me to repaint the wooden fence where I intend it to grow against.
I keep returning to the Princess Diana variety. But, still now sure? Any other ones which I should consider?
Any and all advice, much appreciated.
redwing
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Nunn00123 View Drop Down
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  Quote Nunn00123 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jun 2010 at 10:11am
Hi,
 Certainly C. Princess Diana is a good choice, as are; C. Etoile Violette, Mme Julia Correvon, Pagoda, Blue Angel and Entel, giving you a choice of colours.
All can be prune to a foot above gound level in late February, when you can treat your fence.
 
Also look on the Clematis International website, Previous Clematis of the Month, where you can view and read about plants growing in members gardens. Also you can look at the Clematis for Beginners leaflet, for recommended easy to grow clematis.
 
Yours
 
Roy W Nunn
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redwing View Drop Down
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  Quote redwing Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Jun 2010 at 6:54pm
Finally decided on a Blue Angel and Mme Julia Correvon. Thanks for your advice. As anybody bought a clematis from ebay? If so, what was resulting plant condition etc? Regards,
redwing
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Nunn00123 View Drop Down
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  Quote Nunn00123 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Jun 2010 at 2:10pm

Hi,

I have never considdered buying anthing alive via ebay. My recommendation is to buy from a reputable Nursery, or garden centre, plants can be viewed and chosen with three or more live stems coming from either a 2 or 3 litre pot, the plant should have plenty of root growth, but preferably not pot bound. Buy a plant in flower if possible, as pictures on labels and some catalogues rarely match the colour of the plant.
 
Avoid single stemmed rooted cuttings sold in 7 to 9 centimeter pots, as they will need to be grown on for a year or two potting on into 3 litre pots to ensure adequate size of root ball for planting in the garden, I should imagine this is what one is likely to get from some internet sites.
 
Yours
 
Roy W Nunn
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yaku View Drop Down
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  Quote yaku Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Jun 2010 at 9:39am
Originally posted by Nunn00123

chosen with three or more live stems coming from either a 2 or 3 litre pot, the plant should have plenty of root growth, but preferably not pot bound. Buy a plant in flower if possible, as pictures on labels and some catalogues rarely match the colour of the plant.


Roy, quite a few of the viticellas do only produce a single stem the first few years, still being able to carry a large "head" of flowers.
Pot bound do not affect most Clematis as long they are well feed, from having a well develop rootsystem to being "pot bound' is sometimes only 2-3 weeks differences.
Cheers Peer
 I do sometimes sell plants (1.5liter pots) through "Trade Me"=(NZ equil. to Ebay), just a different public. (1.5liter pots)


Edited by yaku - 24 Jun 2010 at 9:44am
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Nunn00123 View Drop Down
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  Quote Nunn00123 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Jun 2010 at 4:14pm
Hi Peer,
 
About single stemmed clematis. I would never buy a single stemmed clematis, unless it was rare and, or very cheap, then I would expect to have to grow it on for a year or two until more stems were emerging from the compost surface. I prefer more than one stem as insurance, as a hungry mouse may devour a stem or two, but you would be unlucky if it got through all the stems and with some of the nodes buried below the compost surface at this stage even more shoots may emerge from the pot, or if clumsy, I break off the only stem, I usually end up with a dead plant, but there is always the chance of a few cuttings from the broken stem. Most viticella cuttings that I take are double node, which usually gives four stems per plant by the time it is ready for planting in the garden, taking care to pot on and bury some nodes below compost level, when potting on, coupled with pruning any new shoots usually encourages more shoots to emerge lower down the plant. This also means that I do not have to plant deeply, difficult when you have solid chalk rock 30 to 40 cm. below ground level.
 
I have the advantage that I am not producing plants for commercial sales, but for my own enjoyment and to boost my experience of growing plants.
 
You must have to admit that if you have a choice you would opt for a plant with more than one stem emerging from the compost, rather than just a single stem.
 
Looking at some of last seasons cuttings, grown by me, only one has a single stem emerging from the Compost "Josies Midnight Blue", the viticella "Safid Valley" and "Shah Valley" have between two and six stems. The most is from a two year old cutting of an Atragene seedling, which has 10 stems emerging from its three litre pot. Atragenes and viticellas grow really fast here, I wonder if the NZ Climate is less suitable to growth of these plants, certainly the viticellas seem to prefer our very dry, very alkaline climate and soil, but then we struggle with goup two's, wrong soil type, Ph and rainfall, still I can manage without them.
 
Best wishes
 
Roy
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Ron.Carlile View Drop Down
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  Quote Ron.Carlile Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Jun 2010 at 7:56pm
Hi Roy and Peer
I have followed the chat on late flowering Clematis , This evening I have been
looking around my Clematis .  I find that my so called late flowering plants
Princess Diana , Aljonuska , and others are at present in flower or the buds are
half way to flowering . even the largest of my texensis has buds with a tint of
colour in them .  I would say most of my group 3 clematis have buds at this time .
I  just hope they flower through to the Autumn , or it is going to be a bit bare
Ron.C
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Nunn00123 View Drop Down
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  Quote Nunn00123 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Jun 2010 at 10:38pm
Hi Ron,
 
Very often some group threes in our garden are starting to flower in May, this year the early group threes were delayed by about a month, by cold winter and late frosts.
Pettit Foucon (or should I say New Eriostemon) and Kaiu are usually in flower in May but this year it was mid June before the first flowers showed.
 
I suspect that, if the weather remains hot and dry some clematis will stop flowering early in the summer, but some restart if the weather becomes favourable in autumn. There are usually a large number of clematis that do not produce a profusion of flowers all at once that will continue to flower until stopped by the November frosts. C Vanessa is usually a good late flowerer for me and C. Kaiu seems to flower all summer no matter what weather it has to put up with.
 
Keep watering and feeding!
 
Roy
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yaku View Drop Down
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  Quote yaku Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Jun 2010 at 12:18pm

Originally posted by Nunn00123

Hi Peer,

 About single stemmed clematis. I would never buy a single stemmed clematis,

Best wishes

 Roy


Glad you are not one of my customerSmile
If you lived here and wanted Viticellas and some other summer flowering Clematis you would have to live with they only come with a single stem, if the one shoot/stem break of it will be replaced(from below), but with 'Kermesina' I got plants in the garden 6-7 years old with single stem, 'Victoria' do often only produce more than one the first 3-4 years, they still grow quite happy (don't really need more than one stem, a lots of pioneering shrubs only do sucker when in poor conditions) The Atragene are a NO NO here (we can grow them well as annuals , but they never get much size, so to make up you have to plant masses) , they need a winter, bye the way they grow well on acidic soil in west Sweden as well as on alkaline in east. On the other hand Cl. 'Abundance' do produce masses of shoots/stems. 'Kermesina' do produce an abundance of flowers as well as 4-5 metre of growth along the fence. The Viticellas do well in the hot areas here, I think plants often handle Cold or Hot the same way. We are quite temperate here, close to the sea, the snow 50 km away, and 200-300metre up when low.

Cheers Peer



Edited by yaku - 28 Jun 2010 at 12:20pm
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Nunn00123 View Drop Down
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  Quote Nunn00123 Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Jun 2010 at 2:46pm
Hi Peer,
 
Not one of your customers; I think your mail order charges would be excessive anyway!
 
It is interesting to know how Clematis grow in different countries, but even in our garden we get diffeing flowering periods in the same plant. One Etoile Violette has been on flower for tree weeks but the other one 20 yards away has only one flower open at the moment. Strange that the one that has flowered first is slightly more in shade than the single flowered one. Yet a Princess Dianna in full sun has been on flower for two weeks, but the East facing one very close to the fully flowering Etoile Violette does not even have a bud on yet. Most viticellas of 3 or 4 years age will have at least 10 stems in our garden. A 15 year old viticella species collected in Iran has more stems than I would wish to count, probably close on a hundred, as said they like our chalk soil.
 
I have seen C. sibirica growing in vertually pure acidic sand in Estonia, but replicating the conditions in our garden resulted in failure, possibly too warm for them here? Yet all other Atragenes cope with our soil, but possibly would do even better in acidic soil.
 
Cheers
 
Roy
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Beankyu View Drop Down
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  Quote Beankyu Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 15 Jul 2010 at 5:48am
 
Avoid single stemmed rooted cuttings sold in 7 to 9 centimeter pots, as they will need to be grown on for a year or two potting on into 3 litre pots to ensure adequate size of root ball for planting in the garden, I should imagine this is what one is likely to get from some internet sites.
 
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yaku View Drop Down
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  Quote yaku Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 16 Jul 2010 at 12:15pm
Hi Roy
been trying to reach you  on your e-mail addr. (from IClS members list) but get my mail return.  Could you send me your addr, Please, I'm in IClS list
 I'm getting close to potting up, so I'll get a pic of one of my single stemmed Viticella cultivars and post it here, on the wild viticella species you will get masses of stems, but you will not find many of them in the trade.
Cheers Peer

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