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Resolve to try seed!

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bcollingwood View Drop Down
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  Quote bcollingwood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Topic: Resolve to try seed!
    Posted: 24 Dec 2006 at 5:42pm

I can't stress enough how much potential pleasure and reward there is for anyone who gets interested in raising their own clematis from seed!

 
 
At the risk of being repetitive (!) I urge you to resolve to have a go in 2007 if you haven't already done so! You don't need any particular expertise, or a degree in botany, just a little patience and care. You can get seeds from a wide range of sources; for example, just log onto the main BCS website and take a look at the Seed Exchange information. The anticipation of the new flowers is marvellous!
Some of the well-known clematis text books are occasionally somewhat negative about raising from seed but don't pay ANY attention at all, just get on and get it started and don't be put off.

Once you've raised a few plants, you get much more confident, and before long you'll be trying YOUR OWN CROSSES. If you think the anticipation of seeing your own first flowers is big, well, with seed you have produced yourself, from your own crossings, the anticipation is twice over again!!

Today (yes, Christmas Eve!) I managed a couple of hours re-potting and got 20 seedlings done with freezing fingers before the daylight disappeared.


Seedlings Xmas Eve 2006, a few notes:

154C C. texensis. Germination June '06. Another one from Mike Brown’s original plant, from the "remainder pot". Seedling has good buds already extended and looks typical.

171B C. texensis.  Germination Feb '05. Seed from the States; seedling is very healthy and robust, long coiled roots, plenty of buds, looks good.

171D  C. texensis. Seedling similar to 171B, a sister seedling from same germination batch. 

 
 
177B Seedling of C. “Karen Diane” (large-flowered, white patens-like beautiful plant) crossed with clematis coactilis.  Germination August '05. The instant I bared the root down I was excited. Beautiful fully-formed white large basal buds ready almost to begin elongation! A patens-like seedling but buds seem possibly somewhat non patens-like, being a slightly different form, size and bearing? That instils tremendous anticipation for the eventual flowers, which will almost certainly follow during the season. A hybrid of these two plants?... would be very interesting, it goes without saying. The form of the flowers-to-be?...but until the form of the plant really shows, it is easy to get it wrong, and it may be a patens seedling at the end of the day. Because sometimes one does occasionally get seed from a failed hybridisation, even after doing the cross with extreme care. There can be a grain or two of pollen left behind, if you are unlucky, when the anthers are removed, at outset. So the hybridisation from later-introduced pollen can fail, but you still get a few seeds. Impossible to say what the fact of the matter is until at least the form and foliage of the new plant - more than the very juvenile, are evident, and as the ultimate proof, the flowers. You have to be careful and not assume anything.
178 Seedling of “Suzy Mac” (large purple floriferous hybrid) crossed with C. integrifolia var latifolia. Germination August '05. The buds are massive, 3mm or 4mm in length, and the seedling looks fine and healthy, bursting with vigour, lovely gloriously symmetrical root system perfect to every tip! There is only one seedling from the batch, so far, although I still have hopeful faith in the “remainder pot”. The root and forming-crown looks typical of a patens-like seedling and very strong. The possible outcome of the luxurious female parent with the bells of the second excites me as what the flowers could be like. Looks like it could just possibly flower in the coming season.
 
Seed of:  Large-flowered hybrid  x  C. texensis

179C  A seedling of my patens-like white lovely (Alabast-like) seedling “Karen Diane” crossed with my light-red texensis G55A: Germination August '05. The roots are perfect and the buds at the crown well formed and numerous. Looks terribly exciting as to the prospects of the possible eventual flowers. Looks like it could well be good enough to flower in the coming season. The imagination runs riot at the possible outcome of the combination, in the blooms, the female parent strong and very large-flowered, the male a perfect-form example of texensis with a light yellow-white interior.

179D Germination August '05. Exactly the same as for the sister, above, but with more buds and an even better root system.

181A  Seedling of Clematis “Moira”. Germination September '05.  Very hopeful as to the possibilities with this one as the parent is unusual and very double. Parent plant produces a few flowers with occasional intact female parts so there is some seed formed from time to time in the 'house. Large buds, well formed, almost ready to go.

 
Moira 
 
183B  Another lovely texensis seedling, seed from the States. Germination September '05. 

184A  Glory of glories!  My pink-striped lovely large-flowered hybrid crossed with one of my original texensis seedlings, (raised in 1996). If it were possible to capture the best of both parents, in one plant!!! Germination October '05.

186A   Another cross of large-flowered hybrid with clematis texensis, only this time the female parent is a lovely large-flowered boat-shaped sepals lanuginous blue, with same texensis as seedling 184A. Germination November '05. The mind boggles as to the possibility of what the eventual flowers might be like. Possibly could flower in the coming season.

187B The second batch of the same parentage as batch 186. Root superb, full, thick, straw, healthy, looks maybe ok for possible first flowers 2007.

190A Wonder of wonders!!! Seedling of a lovely large-flowered pink-striped Large-flowered hybrid crossed with clematis campaniflora!!! The mind reels at the possibilities!! My God I am lucky! Germination December '05.

Almost-ready C. viticella 'alba luxurians' seed
 
190B Ditto as for 190A Incredibly exciting.
190C Ditto as for 190A and 190B Even more exciting still!!! Imagine having the luck to have 3 seedlings of this parentage, all at once! It must be Christmas!

195A Seedling of BETTY CORNING, seed sent to me by Suzy McMahon in the States. Germination March '06. Root looks really good, buds already formed, looks healthy and sound in constitution, no dwarfism, lovely root and crown, woody at the base of the stem and below. Can’t wait to see the flowers, terribly exciting as there could even eventually be fragrance with the ? flower form.

195B Ditto above but root even better, absolutely studded, covered in juvenile buds, all around the woody stump and the crown. This will be a very, very vigorous plant.

197B another possible patens x coactilis. Germination March '06. Rapture!! Glorious large-white patens crossed (hopefully successfully) with miniature perfection coactilis. Root very strong, excellent; buds look patens-like.

197D Sister of above patens x coactilis. It is easy to get carried away and appearances can be deceptive, especially in small seedlings, but the new buds do resemble coactilis buds somewhat (as opposed to looking just like juvenile patens seedling buds) (honestly!) and I am terribly excited as to what could arise from this line.

197E  Same as above for 197D.

If anyone is interested to see photos of seedlings proper, seedlings' roots and buds I can post some in due course. About another 60 seedlings still to pot up into 1 litre pots, starting after weekend, between Xmas and New Year.

 



Edited by bcollingwood - 12 Feb 2007 at 9:36pm
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keith View Drop Down
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  Quote keith Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Dec 2006 at 10:22pm
I second that in spades. Mike is working like the clappers sorting out the seed now, and we have some interesting new varieties for you to try out this year, so please do your bit, the seed list is happening, now all we need is for the seed sowers to get happening as well - look out for the list in the next newsletter.
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  Quote Helen Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 03 Jan 2007 at 10:03pm
I can tell you, its addictive.  Just been to check pots and Japonica has sprouted.  Now to wait for flowers.Tongue If I can get seed to germinate, then anyone can. I have been given a slight variation on seed sowing, Baggie method, no pot and just moist vermiculite, seed, artificial lights and temp of 20C. The only thing which I think is very tricky is potting these very delicate seedlings up. I have heard super quick germination results. I use BC (Brian Collingwood) method and get germination of pitcheri 180 days,japonica 296 days, intricata mix 60 days, fusca x integrifolia 96 days, crispa 190 days.Smile Gone on, sow seed today, you may get some lovely babies!!
Helen (Sussex UK)
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  Quote bcollingwood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Jan 2007 at 12:24am

Clematis patens-derived seedling at about 300 days after germination which was 12/3/06. This one germinated at the beginning of the season and so for its benefit had the full growth year before its first winter. Already no longer a baby, the 'crown' is beginning to form nicely, below last year's old main stem.
When the seed germinated it produced from its own internal resources a single vertical shoot above, and a single rootlet below: the shoot brought the several pairs of earliest green 'leaves' to the surface and then beyond, into the light, as below:
 
 
On this seedling you can clearly see the seed from which the plant has germinated. The stem and leaves are formed above, the root is developing below.
Next stage - the seed is still clearly visible:
 
 
A close-up of the old seed, from which the plant has germinated:
 
 
 Once above the soil surface the leaves began to absorb the energy of the sun's light, and to store it in the form of carbohydrates and other chemical compounds. The energy that plants need in order to develop structures is incorporated into carbohydrates etc and stored until needed.
As the root grows into the moist soil it begins to absorb dissolved nutrients and bring them into the plant as needed for making vegetative growth. Together these means allow the plantlet to get the stage in the photo.  
By the end of the first season the initial shoot has had time to develop somewhat and has become the stem as seen in the above. 
In this seedling the plant has already readied one massive main bud, for the earliest growth possible, in the new season. There are (darker) buds lower down on this old intial stem, these also will 'break' this coming season around February and begin to elongate in March. During the same period more growth buds will begin to form at the top area of the crown, as it takes on a little more more bulk and becomes more woody. From now on new buds form and become activated each year from this part of the plant. All the aerial parts of the clematis are structures designed to result in reproduction of the plant, and depend wholly on the below-ground structure.  So the clematis plant is really the mass anchored below ground, and the seasonal stems, leaves and flowers, just a means of numerical increase and energy-gathering photosynthesis.  
 
Once young seedlings reach the end of the season in which they germinate they are very robust and fit for survival. It is very rare to lose seedlings after this stage unless they encounter serious drought or fungal/insect/possibly other problems. So most seedlings that get past the early stages will go on to flower.
 
The seedlings are well-equipped to absorb the nutrients they need so don't need other than normal compost, and do not especially need, althought they could benefit from,  additional feeding.
So you can soon get your germinations to this point and once past this (believe it or not!) it is likely that you will be seeing your first flowers before too long! And that's when the excitement starts!!
 
 


Edited by bcollingwood - 07 Jan 2007 at 10:07am
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  Quote keith Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 07 Jan 2007 at 4:04pm
The latest seedlist is now finished, and hopefully will appear with the next newsletter. There are some intersting packets of seed available, not always in large quantity, so if you are tempted when you read it, get your orders in quickly!! I know that I have had a good deal of difficulty ripening off seed this year, as I imagine have other seed donators, so don't waste all our efforts, get organised, and get sowing, you won't regret it (other than the fact that I admit it can get addictive!).
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  Quote katie Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 08 Jan 2007 at 11:23pm
What a great report, Brian!
 
My poor seedlings are out in the cold but up next to the house under the overhang.  I keep them somewhat moist and figure the hardy ones will pull though.
 
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  Quote bcollingwood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 Jan 2007 at 1:23pm

For anyone interested in new plants, some pictures of new flowers. Raised from seed; 2006 first-flowers in the main. Any of these plants could be grown by any amateur gardener.

http://www.worsleyhallgardencentre.com/clematis_corner.htm scroll down the page for the pictures.

 

The BCS seed list for 2007 is due out soon- If you join the BCS you can order seeds and have them sent to your home by post; or you buy them from the Shows attended by the BCS; the list will be published shortly. Thanks to the efforts of those involved, again a comprehensive offering from the entire Genus.

 

Some clematis take some time to germinate and reach flowering, others will germinate and flower in the first or second season. Whichever, it is always terribly exciting to watch the first-ever flowers open!!

 

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  Quote suzymac Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Jan 2007 at 5:31pm
Thank you, Brian !  I'm simply thrilled to read about what you have happening in the greenhouse these days !   And yes, growing from seed is the ' ultimate ' experience for  clematis enthusiasts.  Your wonderful instructions on growing from seed have helped many a newbee enjoy fine results on their very first try.   Each year, my  own anticipation and enjoyment increase as spring approaches and the 'first flower buds' appear on the previous year's seedlings.  I've been growing from seed for about six or seven years now (thanks to you for your help!) and have had some wonderful results.
Below are pictures of my  first seedlings:

And next  are the results of many of the babies you see growing above:

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v371/Suzymac/2004%202005%20seedlings/?start=all

I hope the above link works.  If not, I apologise and will try to figure out how to do this correctly.

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  Quote schristmas Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Jan 2007 at 10:29pm
As Brian has already mentioned the BCS seed exchange is one way for everyone to get hold of seed and get involved in this most addictive and thoroughly pleasing pastime.
I have now posted last years seed list on the website so everyone can get an idea of the diiferent types of seed available through this well subscribed activity.
Those who are members will be able to log in and see the current seed list, although at the time of posting it is not due to be published for the next couple of weeks.
 


Edited by schristmas - 25 Jan 2007 at 10:31pm
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  Quote Mariko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 27 Jan 2007 at 10:53pm
Hi, Suzy.
It is a long time. Do you remember me?HugThank you for teaching many things.
I had you teach.  however I poor at English was not able to write. I am sorry.Pinch

Sowing is pleasant.





Edited by Mariko - 27 Jan 2007 at 11:01pm

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  Quote ton hannink Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Jan 2007 at 4:44pm
Mariko,
A lot of seedlings. Thank you for showing us.
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  Quote suzymac Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Jan 2007 at 1:33am
Hello Mariko !  Yes, of course I remember you and it is nice to see you here.   Your collection of seedling  plants is amazing to my eyes.  What a fine job you have done and there are so many !   Just fabulous.
I hope to see many pictures of your first flowers.  
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  Quote Mariko Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 29 Jan 2007 at 9:24pm
Good morning. Steve, Ton, Suzy.
Suzy. Thank you for remembering .
Having shown in a disorderly work place was shameful. but Thank you for seeing.
It is pleasant and It is very busyness.
Mariko Nakanishi

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  Quote bcollingwood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 11 Feb 2007 at 11:51pm

Hi Mariko, a lot of very exciting seedlings, would be lovely to see pictures of flowers.... I hope you'll treat us to some when they arrive!

 

 



Edited by bcollingwood - 12 Feb 2007 at 7:07am
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  Quote richardh Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 12 Feb 2007 at 6:39pm
I was fortunate to visit Brian and his offspring with Northern BCS last September and wow was I impressed and I must admit slightly envious of some of his creations-----we are so lucky to have Brian to share all his knowledge and enthusiasm with us ---every credit !
So do as he says--get some seeds sown!
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  Quote bcollingwood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Mar 2007 at 10:55am
March

 At this time of year a couple of weeks makes the most amazing difference!

 Another four or five weeks from now and there will be flowers available for hybridising. If any local people (local to Manchester!) would like to see hybridising in progress, drop me a line and come and visit! Any visitors (you don't have to be a member of the BCS to come, but you can join the BCS at my place if you wish) have to pay an exorbitant entry fee (£2.00 or whatever you like, 100% to BCS funds). This year's crossings will hopefully (subject to time pressure limitations!) involve clematis florida, patens, viticella, and some large-flowered hybrids, with clematis texensis, fusca, viorna, coactilis, freemontii, hirsutissima, and several viornae-group hybrids. The seeds will follow from mid-season through to the end of the year and will  be sowed immediately for germination in 2008/9. If you come you will likely see hybridising at all stages; from "isolation" to "uncovering" is a one-week cycle.


Edited by bcollingwood - 25 Mar 2007 at 2:32pm
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  Quote norman Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Jul 2007 at 3:19pm

  My first LFC from seed.sown in 2004 from BCS. Flowers are 6inch.

norman
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  Quote bcollingwood Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Jul 2007 at 5:31pm
Absolutely excellent Norman, you must be very pleased indeed, I would be anyway!  You may well find that the colours alter somewhat next year; or maybe not - - - as the case may be.
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